Creative Students Offer Prettier Option For Plastic Recycle

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  • PRETTIER OPTION FOR RECYCLED PLASTICS   Samalaeulu primary school students Victor Sofe, Gapua Iamafana and Rolita Faaopoopo pictured before their beautiful decorative artwork created from recycled styrofoam plastic cups and plates.
    PRETTIER OPTION FOR RECYCLED PLASTICS   Samalaeulu primary school students Victor Sofe, Gapua Iamafana and Rolita Faaopoopo pictured before their beautiful decorative artwork created from recycled styrofoam plastic cups and plates.

A trio of Savai’i students offered a prettier option for plastic recycle, by turning them into flowers, worthy enough to decorate inside churches.

Samalaeulu Primary School students, Rolita Faaopoopo, Gapua Iamafana and Victor Sofe, presented their work during Literacy Week organised by the Ministry Of Education Sports and Culture for the week just ended.

The plastic flowers will be recycled from Styrofoam cups and plates that are expected to follow the ban on single use plastic bags already in place.

"It is interesting to see what trash can do,” Rolita Faaopoopo pointed out to Newsline Samoa.

“In just a blink of an eye, the trash creates a beautiful flower that is going to be in use for a very long time.”

Faaopoopo reasoned that it is very important to realize there are still good things to be created from the things we don't care about anymore.

Fellow student Gapua Iamafana also told Newsline Samoa that while it is a known option, the point to highlight is the collection of  plastics to be recycled, instead of throwing them out in the trash.

"I know the call is out for plastics to be banned, but I believe we can work to save the planet by looking at ways we can make better use of plastics with other useful options,” Iamafana believes.

“I know plastics will still be in use, but they’re for another purpose,  that would save on unnecessary expenses on home decorations and public buildings like halls and churches."

For the third member of the project team, Victor Sofe is happy that his school was able to offer a simple alternative that is better for everyone.

"I know that foams are bad for us but if we can use it in a way that will save us money and time, it is still to our advantage.

“For us in Savaii, we don’t have everything available to us like in Upolu, but if we can make use of the little we have, it’ll be a blessing.”

Whatever the final outcome of the option they have offered, the visit to Apia and being part of the Literacy Week is an unforgettable experience, as students from Savai’i.

The sharing with other students selected from schools around the country are lifetime highlights to remember of primary education.

 

 

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